As Denver’s housing market continues to thrive, so, too, do the development-related concerns of existing residents.  The rapid pace of development in many City-close neighborhoods has at times pitted residents desiring attractive, pedestrian-oriented communities against developers responding to high demand for urban housing options.  On Monday, August 22, 2016, the Denver City Council passed a pair of City-wide development moratoria aimed at addressing parking and architectural issues.  CB16-0498 concerns use of the City’s small zone lot parking exemption.  CB-16-0541 places a one-year moratorium on use of the Zoning Code’s Garden Court Building Form.  Both bills passed with a unanimous vote of Councilmembers present and took effect August 25, 2016.  Continue Reading Denver City Council Passes Pair of Development Moratoria

Colorado’s growing high-tech scene is currently driving the office leasing activities in metro Denver.  According to CBRE’s Colorado Tech Book 2016, high-tech companies leased 1.1 million square feet of office space, or 16.5% of the total leased space, in metro Denver last year, making it the largest industry represented in the market. Overall, technology firms are leasing approximately 9.8 million square feet in metro Denver and 15.5 million square feet in Colorado.

Continue Reading High-Tech Companies Continue to Lease Office Space in Denver

This post was authored by Otten Johnson summer law clerk Alex Gano.  Alex is a third-year law student at the University of Colorado Law School.

On July 12, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock and Councilwoman Robin Kniech announced the final details of their plan to create the City’s first “dedicated funding stream” for affordable housing.  The Office of Economic Development estimates that two sources of revenue will generate a minimum of $150 million over the next ten years, which the City will invest in at least 6,000 new and existing affordable housing units.  Continue Reading Denver’s Proposed “Permanent Affordable Housing Fund”: What to Expect

In a recent decision, the Colorado Court of Appeals upheld a Nebraska choice of law provision found in a promissory note.   The dispute centered around which state’s statute of limitations should apply to a collection action on the promissory note.  Colorado’s statute of limitations for actions to collect on a promissory note is six years; Nebraska’s is only five years.  Because the plaintiff filed the lawsuit approximately five and a half years after the borrower had defaulted, the resolution of the choice of law issue would decide the case. Continue Reading Enforceability of Choice of Law Provisions

Last night, Denver’s City Council passed the short-term rental regulations recommended by the Planning Commission to the second reading, despite opposition from short-term rental platforms, such as HomeAway, and industry leaders regarding the “primary dwelling unit” requirement. City Council also voted down amendments to the proposed regulations submitted by two City Councilmembers. The second reading and public hearing is scheduled for June 13.

Update: City Council passed the proposed regulations at the June 13 hearing. Our recent client alert provides more information on the approved short-term rental regulations and other factors to consider prior to renting your home.