California Investor Buys former StorageTek/ConocoPhillips Campus in Bid for Amazon

In a bid to have Amazon select Boulder County as its much-ballyhooed second headquarters, California’s Bancroft Capital recently went under contract to purchase the 432-acre property (depicted below) in Louisville that is the former home of StorageTek.  The property is currently owned by ConocoPhillips. Bancroft also developed the Peloton project in Boulder.

Google Buys Property

As it nears completion on the first phase of its new 4-acre campus at 30th and Pearl in Boulder, Google has purchased land and two buildings at its campus for just under $131 million. Google originally intended to lease the buildings.  “The acquisitions make sense fiscally, but also demonstrate our commitment to Boulder,” said Scott Green, the Boulder site lead for Google.  “In our 11 years operating here, Google has come to value the community, its talent base and its quality of life.”

County Adds Senior Housing at Record Rate, Creating Concerns for Some Areas

By 2030, baby boomers are forecasted to comprise roughly 20% of Boulder County residents. Developers have taken note: since 2012, a dozen senior housing developments have been constructed, and three more are under construction or in planning. Together, these projects will add nearly 1,000 units to the county’s senior housing product. But some areas are expressing concerns about providing such an ample supply of senior housing—at least within their limits.  Lafayette, for example, will be home to one third of the new senior housing units and is already reporting that the existing senior population is overwhelming the city’s emergency services.  The city is so concerned, in fact, about the effects of attracting such a large baby boomer population that it’s considering a temporary moratorium on baby boomer-focused construction.  Senior housing experts counter that such a moratorium could exacerbate the county’s growing housing crunch, especially for low- and middle-income elderly who are already under-served.

On Monday night, the Denver City Council approved an ordinance creating Denver’s fifty-third historic district: Packard’s Hill Historic District. Located in the West Highlands neighborhood, the District spans north to south from 35th to 32nd Avenue, and east to west from Lowell Boulevard to Perry Street.  The new district encompasses eight city blocks, and includes thirty-nine Queen Anne-style houses, twenty-nine bungalows, and twenty-six classic cottage houses dating from the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Continue Reading Denver City Council Designates Packard’s Hill Historic District in West Highlands

Tuesday evening the Boulder City Council unanimously approved the $9.5 million purchase of the 615-acre parcel located at 4536 N. 95th St. (pictured below) to add to the city’s 45,000-acre open space network.  The parcel is the fourth most expensive open-space parcel purchased by the city, will be one of the largest, and will become the easternmost piece of the city’s open-space network.  Because of its 1.5 miles of Boulder Creek frontage, eight ponds, mountain views, and abundant wildlife, the city believes the parcel has tremendous potential for recreational and agricultural purposes.  The city will spend approximately 18 months evaluating the parcel after acquiring it before opening it to visitors.

Image result for boulder valley farm

David Brewster, a summer law clerk with Otten Johnson, authored this post. David is a rising third-year law student at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law.

Rapid population growth and lagging infrastructure development in the Denver Metro Area are re-energizing a debate between advocates of long term growth strategies and “slow-growth” advocates. Recently, a Lakewood-based grassroots group known as Strategic Growth for Lakewood submitted more than 7,500 signatures supporting a growth management initiative for the upcoming general election. The initiative’s proposed ordinance would limit new residential unit developments to 1% of exiting units in a given year. Additionally, the ordinance would require City Council approval and public hearings for projects of 40 or more residential units. Continue Reading Revitalizing a Rocky Mountain Debate: “Slow-Growth” Strategies v. Long-Term Planning