David Brewster, a summer law clerk with Otten Johnson, authored this post. David is a rising third-year law student at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law.

Rapid population growth and lagging infrastructure development in the Denver Metro Area are re-energizing a debate between advocates of long term growth strategies and “slow-growth” advocates. Recently, a Lakewood-based grassroots group known as Strategic Growth for Lakewood submitted more than 7,500 signatures supporting a growth management initiative for the upcoming general election. The initiative’s proposed ordinance would limit new residential unit developments to 1% of exiting units in a given year. Additionally, the ordinance would require City Council approval and public hearings for projects of 40 or more residential units. Continue Reading Revitalizing a Rocky Mountain Debate: “Slow-Growth” Strategies v. Long-Term Planning

Rows of tiny houses await final construction details from volunteers.
Rows of tiny houses await finishing touches from volunteers, which include future residents.

About two weeks into construction, the “Beloved Community Village” is taking shape on an otherwise vacant lot near 38th and Brighton. According to the group organizing volunteers for the build, the project for people experiencing homelessness currently has more volunteers than work, but encourages those who want to help to drop by with snacks, a donation, or just to say hi. As covered in an earlier blog post, the community will include eleven individual shelters, as well as shared kitchen and bathroom facilities.

Many of the residents selected for the Beloved Community Village have had issues getting into Denver’s shelters—there are a few couples who want to live together, a transgender person, a person in a wheelchair, and Sandra Herman, who has pets. Credit: Westword
Many of the residents selected for the Beloved Community Village have had issues getting into Denver’s shelters—there are a few couples who want to live together, a transgender person, a person in a wheelchair, and Sandra Herman, who has pets. Credit: Westword

Earlier this week, Denver approved a temporary zoning permit for a tiny-house community for homeless people, the “Beloved Community Village.” The community will include eleven 8-foot by 12-foot shelters, as well as shared kitchen and bathroom facilities, constructed for about $130,000 on Urban Land Conservancy-owned property at 38th and Walnut Streets in the RiNo neighborhood. Continue Reading Local Governments Making Room for Tiny Homes

In an effort to encourage licensing, Denver has streamlined its website and placed advertisements on popular social media networks.
In an effort to encourage licensing, Denver has streamlined its website and placed advertisements on popular social media networks.

Enforcement of Denver’s short-term rental regulations, which were passed in the summer of 2016, started January 1, 2017.  However, not all hosts seem to have gotten the message, with only about 18 percent of Denver properties on Airbnb including their license numbers in the listing—a requirement under the new regulations.  Continue Reading Hosts of Short-Term Rentals Slow to Obtain Licenses, Face Hefty Fines

Last night, Denver’s City Council passed the short-term rental regulations recommended by the Planning Commission to the second reading, despite opposition from short-term rental platforms, such as HomeAway, and industry leaders regarding the “primary dwelling unit” requirement. City Council also voted down amendments to the proposed regulations submitted by two City Councilmembers. The second reading and public hearing is scheduled for June 13.

Update: City Council passed the proposed regulations at the June 13 hearing. Our recent client alert provides more information on the approved short-term rental regulations and other factors to consider prior to renting your home.