Last month, Denver City Council voted 10-1 in favor of approving a contract between the City and Village Collaborative, an organization that “exists to create and operate transformational housing communities in partnership with people coming from homelessness.”  Under the terms of the contract, the City agreed to contribute $899,569 “to fund two Safe Outdoor Space (SOS) sites, with amenities and services that provide outdoor accommodation for up to 100 households.”  On July 1, 2020, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock announced Denver’s initial partnership with Village Collaborative, the Interfaith Alliance of Colorado, and other nonprofit organizations for the development of SOS sites within the City.  Since that announcement, Village Collective has operated an SOS site at the Denver Community Church (1595 Pearl Street), and the Interfaith Alliance of Colorado has operated an SOS site at the First Baptist Church of Denver (1373 Grant Street).  The earmarked funds approved by City Council this month will be used to fund Village Collective’s existing SOS site at the Denver Community Church.
Continue Reading Denver Approves Funding for Safe Outdoor Camping Sites for Individuals Experiencing Homelessness; Aurora Looking to Follow Suit

In 2018, the Colorado Water Conservation Board (the CWCB) published the current version of the State’s Drought Mitigation and Response Plan (the DMRP).  Originally prepared in accordance with the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-390), and adopted by the Office of the Governor, the DMRP is intended to provide State and local authorities with “effective and systematic” methods of combatting short- and long-term water shortages throughout Colorado.  The DMRP contemplates a three-phase Drought Plan Implementation Cycle, with Phase 3 of the cycle activated in times of extreme or exceptional drought.
Continue Reading Amid Grim 2021 Drought Projections, Governor Polis Activates the Municipal Water Impact Task Force

In July, voters in Lakewood approved a one percent per annum cap on residential unit construction.  Now, a proposed ballot measure aiming to require counties along the Front Range to follow suit is one step closer to appearing on Colorado’s 2020 ballot.
Continue Reading Front Range-Wide Residential Growth Cap One Step Closer to Colorado’s 2020 Ballot

This post was authored by Alexandra Haggarty.  Alex is a summer clerk at Otten Johnson, and a rising 3L at the University of Colorado Law School.

This post is an update on three earlier posts about a citizen initiative to limit residential growth in Lakewood, Colorado.

With a near 53 percent majority, voters in the City of Lakewood approved Ballot Question 200, capping growth of residential unit construction by one percent annually and requiring city council approval of projects with forty or more units.  The city joins Boulder and neighboring Golden in responding to Colorado’s population growth by capping development.

Proponents of the initiative argue that it will preserve Lakewood’s culture and environment.  Specifically, the initiative was pitched as a way to preserve open space, protect single-family development, ensure that infrastructure and services are not overburdened, and curb alleged problems of unmanaged growth, such as crime and urban decay.
Continue Reading Lakewood Voters Pass Strategic Growth Initiative